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Reduce work-related sexual misconduct.

NEW ARTICLE!
When To Approach HR in Sexual Misconduct Cases And When to Avoid Them

What is Sexual Misconduct?

What is Sexual Misconduct?

"Sexual misconduct" is the term given to three, unwanted workplace-related behaviors that involve sex or gender, specifically:

  • Physical assault of a "sexual nature",
  • Non-physical harassment of a "sexual nature," and
  • Gender discrimination, including remarks of a derogatory or demeaning nature.

Indeed, the federal government refers to all three as "sexual harassment."
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Sexual harassment and misconduct can consist of a single egregious experience or many experiences that in combination create a hostile work environment. Some sexual misconduct, such as rape, violates criminal laws; some violates civil laws, such as the right to a nondiscriminatory work environment. Criminal and civil violations such as these may be tried in court.

However, many organizations and professional associations also have standards of conduct, such as treating colleagues with respect or restricting dating between colleagues. Sexual harassment/misconduct may violate such policies even if it does not technically rise to the government's definition of sexual harassment or a hostile work environment. Such actions may be fireable offenses.

Sexual misconduct can occur in any situation where it is reasonable to expect professional behavior and a perpetrator is associated with an organization or profession, including in interviews, at parties and conferences, and in locker rooms or doctors' offices.

How Can Meeting Survivors of the Same Perpetrator Help You?

How Can Meeting Survivors of the Same Perpetrator Help You?

Some forms of sexual harassment and misconduct consist of a number of repeated interactions that demonstrate the perpetrator(s) intentionally targeted a person. The #MeToo movement has revealed that, far too often, a serial perpetrator uses similar tactics with multiple targets. When a pattern of behavior is established that involves multiple targets, proving sexual misconduct is easier, whether in a court room when "prior bad acts" witnesses are called or within a company, even after statutes of limitations have passed for some or most of them.

Why Report Sexual Harassment?

Why Report Sexual Harassment?

There are many reasons to report sexual harassment. One of the most powerful is to protect others by preventing the perpetrator from striking again. Because the media often discourages reporting by publishing stories of obstacles and retaliation, we are collecting Successes in Misconduct Reporting.